In general, most synthetic ropes are like that, to one level or another. This is actually a hollow braid kind of rope; meaning it’s a polypropylene braid wrapped around a core of something. Above; undyed five mil tossa jute; below, 6 mil dyed tossa jute. It takes natural fibre dye surprisingly well, given the already existing golden colour. It feels really soft and smooth; very good flex, too. Likely to get quite compact knots with it. The tighter the lay, the stiffer and more durable the rope tends to be. Tossa is actually a pretty tight lay, which means it needs a bit of extra conditioning or a long period of break in time before it’s really good to tie with, due to that extra stiffness. You can almost see the scratchiness. Cons:.

Cons:. Basically all the same cons as the one just above, with the addition of bulkier knots due to the increased thickness of it. Cons. This is a very thin plastic webbing; it is not something you want to get too close to a naked flame, because it will melt. Answered the whole question, just like that. And wasn’t it just frustrating as hell?

You’re going to need knots, which will take a tiny bit longer. It’s not dyeable; you’re stuck with the colour you buy. Tossa is actually a pretty tight lay, which means it needs a bit of extra conditioning or a long period of break in time before it’s really good to tie with, due to that extra stiffness. That said, spending a bit of time breaking in your rope isn’t really that onerous. This is pretty cool because you don’t get bulky, unsightly looking knots. Small knots; sits flat over skin. And tastes and priorities may change, which is cool. Mine certainly have: I went from feeling “so-so” about hemp to loving it, just by getting a different supplier.

It has this really interesting feature; with the core removed, it actually sits quite flat on the skin, which is why I refer to it as webbing. This has multiple advantages; it spreads any pressure from the tie over a wider surface, and it doesn’t catch on things when you’re rolling around, struggling, what have you. Nothing I’ve done to it has fixed this. It may be because it’s sort of a short fibred rope, or it might just be the stuff I got hold of. I’ll even include pictures! Aren’t I just the nicest? I’m going to go over the kinds of rope pictured above, from left to right.

Not terribly pricey at Bunnings. Cons:. To your right is a picture of braided cotton rope from one of the many 1-8 dollar shops in my city. It is by far the cheapest useful rope I’ve ever come across. I can’t give you as thorough a break down on it, but I made some observations. Nylon at Bunnings. What are the pros and cons of different types of rope? What type of rope is best for you? I have some recommendations above, under “What type of rope should I use? ”, but here are some qualtiies that will let you understand why I made those recommendations and let you better decide for yourself. Different ropes have different advantages, different pros and cons. What you like will very likely not be what someone else likes.